Welding

Have you a flair for working with your hands and the ability to concentrate, read drawings and work out measurements?  If so, have you considered a career in welding? This entry level course provides participants with the practical and technical skills to carry out welding tasks on construction projects and in metal fabrication and manufacturing shops. They will develop the skills needed to read and interpret engineering drawings, select and mount abrasive wheels, carry out manual metal arc, M.I.G. and T.I.G. welding, use oxy-acetylene cutting equipment and work safely on construction sites.  The course lays a solid foundation on which to build a career.  Graduates from the course will typically seek employment as trainee welders with engineering, metal fabrication, manufacturing and construction companies.  There is also the option, for those who meet the entry criteria, of seeking apprenticeships in one of the related trades such as Fitting, Metal Fabrication, Pipe Fitting or the soon to be introduced trade of Craft Welder.  Kerry ETB Training Centre also offers higher level courses in Intermediate Welding and Coded Pipe Welding.

  • Induction – State the planned outcomes and conditions attached to the course; apply good safety, health and hygiene practices; state the basic principles involved in environmental issues; and explain the meaning of equal opportunities.
  • Reading Basic Technical Drawings – Demonstrate knowledge of drawing conventions and principles, read and interpret basic technical drawings, and interpret welding symbols.
  • Machine Tools (Welding) – Competently use angle grinders, bench grinders, belt sanders and band saws associated with welding.
  • Manual Metal Arc Welding* – Identify M.M.A. welding equipment and describe the M.M.A. welding process. Identify the safety hazards associated with M.M.A. welding and state the safety procedures to be followed when working with M.M.A. welding equipment.  Competently use M.M.A. welding to produce fillet welds in horizontal and overhead positions and to weld lap fillets, tee fillets and butt joints to industry standard EN 9606.
  • I.G. Welding* – Identify M.I.G. welding equipment and describe the M.I.G. welding process. Identify the safety hazards associated with M.I.G. welding and state the safety procedures to be followed when working with M.I.G. welding equipment. Competently use M.I.G. welding equipment to weld lap joints in the 2F and 3F positions, tee joints in the 2F and 3F positions and outside corner joints in the 2F and 3F positions to industrial standard EN 9606.
  • I.G. Welding* – Identify T.I.G. welding equipment and describe the T.I.G. welding process. Identify the safety hazards associated with T.I.G. welding and state the safety procedures to be followed when working with T.I.G. welding equipment. Competently use T.I.G. welding equipment to weld lap joints in the 2F and 3F position and tee joints in the 2F and 3F position in mild steel, stainless steel and aluminium plate.
  • Oxy-Acetylene Cutting – Explain the oxy-acetylene process and identify the parts and function of the oxy-acetylene equipment. Identify the safety hazards associated with oxy-acetylene cutting and the safety procedures to be followed when working with oxy-acetylene cutting equipment.  Select and install nozzles for different material thicknesses. Set up Oxy acetylene equipment.  Use oxy-acetylene to cut straight lines, circles and shapes in mild steel.
  • Safepass* – Work on construction sites without being a danger to yourself or others. The topics include: Promoting a safety culture, identifying your duties and responsibilities at work, accident reporting and emergency procedures, working safely at heights, safe working procedures in excavations and confined spaces, safety precautions when working with electricity and underground and overhead services, use of personal protective equipment, safety rules when using vehicles and mobile plant, correct lifting and carrying techniques, proper health and hygiene practices, and safe use of hand-held equipment, tools and machinery.
  • Career Planning and Job Seeking Skills – Plan and achieve realistic work and career goals.
  • In Company Training – Work independently, while under general supervision, in an company or specific vocational context related to welding and carry out vocationally related welding tasks over a period of time.

A number of training methods are used to deliver this course. These include instructions, presentations, skills demonstrations, supervised skills practice, practical workplace training, simulated work environment, discussion groups, and giving and receiving feedback. Participants are required to actively participate in the learning process. They must complete a number of welding exercises throughout the course and keep a portfolio of their progress. A number of methods are used to assess the participants’ progress and for certification purposes. These include welding exercises and assessments, multi-choice exams and project work.

  • Reached the statutory school leaving age.
  • Have an aptitude for and genuine interest in welding.
  • Junior Certificate or equivalent level of education.
  • Good spatial aptitude, hand-eye co-ordination and manual dexterity.

Graduates from this course will typically seek entry level or apprenticeship positions with mechanical engineering, metal fabrication, construction engineering and manufacturing companies.